Predict. What you can never understand…

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Artificial intelligence can predict premature death, according to a study.

Computers which are capable of teaching themselves to predict premature death could greatly improve preventative healthcare in the future, suggests a new study by experts at the University of Nottingham.

The team of healthcare data scientists and doctors have developed and tested a system of computer-based ‘machine learning’ algorithms to predict the risk of early death due to chronic disease in a large middle-aged population. (1)

Computers predicting what they can never understand.

Is there any other way?

We can only predict what we do not know.

Look at the flower.

Smell the wind.

Feel the rain falling…

You will never predict them.

And yet, you smile.

Only because you know all there is to know about them…

Nanomaterials. AI. Prediction.

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Breakthroughs in the field of nanophotonics – how light behaves on the nanometer scale – have paved the way for the invention of “metamaterials,” human-made materials that have enormous applications, from remote nanoscale sensing to energy harvesting and medical diagnostics. But their impact on daily life has been hindered by a complicated manufacturing process with large margins of error.

An interdisciplinary Tel Aviv University study published in “Light: Science and Applications” demonstrated a way of streamlining the process of designing and characterizing basic nanophotonic, metamaterial elements.

“Our new approach depends almost entirely on Deep Learning, a computer network inspired by the layered and hierarchical architecture of the human brain,” Prof. Wolf explains. “It’s one of the most advanced forms of machine learning, responsible for major advances in technology, including speech recognition, translation and image processing. We thought it would be the right approach for designing nanophotonic, metamaterial elements”.

The scientists fed a Deep Learning network with 15,000 artificial experiments to teach the network the complex relationship between the shapes of the nanoelements and their electromagnetic responses. “We demonstrated that a ‘trained’ Deep Learning network can predict, in a split second, the geometry of a fabricated nanostructure,” Dr. Suchowski says. (1)

Imitating the human brain.

To predict what the human brain cannot predict.

Could you have a better proof that our brain is not algorithmic?

We are humans not because we can tell the future.

But because we have experienced it already.

We are humans not because we can find the answers.

But because we can ask the questions…

We are gods not because we know how metamaterials will form.

But because we don’t even care…

Predictions. Crowds. Humans. Universe.

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Electrons whizzing around each other and humans crammed together at a political rally don’t seem to have much in common, but researchers are connecting the dots. They’ve developed a highly accurate mathematical approach to predict the behavior of crowds of living creatures, using methods originally developed to study large collections of quantum mechanically interacting electrons. (1)

Humans moving as atoms. Atoms moving as humans.

In a world full of light, we try to find darkness.

In a cosmos full of soul, we try to find matter.

At the end, we look so hard that we miss the point.

Are we moving like atoms?

Or are the atoms moving like us?

Hard to see through the cosmos and understand it.

Especially when you are the mirror reflecting it…

Unpredictable love. Unpredictable cosmos.

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Here’s some heartbreaking news for people pinning their hopes on online matchmaking sites: It’s virtually impossible to forecast a love connection.

Maybe that’s not so shocking to survivors of the dating wars. But now science is weighing in. Extensive background data on two individuals — comparable to that collected by digital dating services — can’t predict whether that pair will romantically click during a four-minute, face-to-face speed date, say psychologist Samantha Joel of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City and colleagues. (1)

Love is unpredictable.

Hate is unpredictable.

Life is unpredictable.

Even predictable things are unpredictable.

No, no. The planets do not move in constant trajectories.

Ina galaxy far far away…

There was a princess once.

And a boy she loved.

That boy grew dark.

And at the end, whole planets were destroyed.

And because life is unpredictable.

Because hate is unpredictable.

Because love is unpredictable.

Everything is unpredictable…

Science and Astronomy. As in “Astrology”. No, really! Read the article!

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We are not blank slates with regard to how susceptible we are to emerging strains of flu virus, researchers have discovered. These findings could provide relevant information for the development of a universal flu vaccine.

Your birth year predicts – to a certain extent – how likely you are to get seriously ill or die in an outbreak of an animal-origin influenza virus, according to a study co-led by researchers from the University of Arizona in Tucson and the University of California, Los Angeles. (1)

Meet science.

It is like the old science.

Just without the Logos…

The stars do affect you. Everything affects you.

Not because they are there. But because you are here…

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