Going back in time… With no change…

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We cannot reverse the arrow of time any more than we can erase all our wrinkles or restore a shattered teacup to its original form.

Or can we?

An international team of scientists led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory managed to return a computer briefly to the past.

To achieve the time reversal, the research team developed an algorithm for IBM’s public quantum computer that simulates the scattering of a particle. In classical physics, this might appear as a billiard ball struck by a cue, traveling in a line. But in the quantum world, one scattered particle takes on a fractured quality, spreading in multiple directions. To reverse its quantum evolution is like reversing the rings created when a stone is thrown into a pond.

In nature, restoring this particle back to its original state – in essence, putting the broken teacup back together – is impossible, since you would need a ​”supersystem” to manipulate the particle’s quantum waves at every point. The time required for this supersystem to properly manipulate the quantum waves would extend longer than that of the universe itself.

The team managed to overcome this complexity, at least in principle. Their algorithm simulated an electron scattering by a two-level quantum system,​ “impersonated” by a quantum computer qubit and its related evolution in time. The electron goes from a localized, or​ “seen,” state, to a scattered one. Then the algorithm throws the process in reverse, and the particle returns to its initial state – in other words, it moves back in time, if only by a tiny fraction of a second. (1)

Going back in time.

By returning to the original state.

Because time is defined by change.

But what does this mean?

This doesn’t mean they go back in time.

But that time wasn’t there in the first place…

The 2nd law of thermodynamics.

The arrow of time.

The fate of the universe.

Everything will be back to their original state at the end.

And the end will be the new beginning.

Going back in time.

Where time is nothing but a fleeting feeling.

Open your eyes.

Can you dream of how you started dreaming?

Life. Existence. Quantum mechanics.

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We’re a little closer to explaining life with quantum mechanics thanks to research carried out with an IBM supercomputer.

Encoding behaviours related to self-replication, mutation, interaction between individuals, and (inevitably) death, a quantum algorithm has been used to show that quantum computers can indeed mimic some of the patterns of biology in the real world. This is still an early proof-of-concept prototype, but it opens the door to diving further into the relationship between quantum mechanics and the origins of life.

The same principles governing quantum physics may even have had a role to play in forming our genetic code. (1)

Life is weird.

We are not sure what it is.

But we are sure it is something (good).

Death is weird.

We not sure what it is.

But we are sure it is something (bad).

But could both perceptions be wrong?

Look through the mirror of existence.

Life as a result of death.

Death as a result of life.

A cosmos balancing between existence and non-existence.

For Being is neither…

Demons. Computers. A world of chaos. Death by order.

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Physicists have employed a version of Maxwell’s demon to reduce entropy in a three-dimensional lattice of super-cooled, laser-trapped atoms – a process that could help speed progress toward creating quantum computers. (1)

A cosmos full of chaos.

We struggle into increasing order in the universe.

At the end we will succeed.

And the cosmos will die.

Look at the butterfly. It is not beautiful because it is orderly and neat. It is beautiful because it is a chaotic little creature looking for a mate before it dies. Look at the stars. They are not beautiful because they are tidy and neat. They are beautiful because they are raging with fire and heat. Look at you. You are not as orderly a creature as you might think.  Changing every minute. Full of different cells and even different organisms. Full of rage, love, forgiveness, hate, sins and emotions.

Accept yourself.

The path to heaven passes through chaos.

Don’t trust the demons.

Order is another synonym of Hell…

Quantum memories…

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Quantum cryptography today uses optical fiber over several hundred kilometers and is marked by its high degree of security: it is impossible to copy or intercept information without making it disappear.

However, the fact that it is impossible to copy the signal also prevents scientists from amplifying it to diffuse it over long distances, as is the case with the Wi-Fi network.

Since the signal cannot be copied or amplified without it disappearing, scientists are currently working on how to make quantum memories capable of repeating it by capturing the photons and synchronizing them, so they can be diffused further and further. All that remains is to find the right material for making these quantum memories. “The difficulty is finding a material capable of isolating the quantum information conveyed by the photons from environmental disturbances so that we can hold on to them for a second or so and synchronize them”.

Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, in partnership with CNRS, France, have discovered a new material in which an element, ytterbium, can store and protect the fragile quantum information even while operating at high frequencies. (1)

Conveying messages.

Message that will be lost.

Inside the whirling wind…

The great mountain is looking.

Listening to all the messages.

Passing through the forest trees.

It knows that it will be here tomorrow.

But it will not convey the message.

Because that was never the goal.

The message was not to be conveyed.

Only the silence was.

Before and after the message…

Can you listen to the wind?

Quantum mechanics. Time. Causality. Irrational. Hiding the meaning of life…

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Watch a movie backwards and you’ll likely get confused – but a quantum computer wouldn’t. That’s the conclusion of researcher Mile Gu at the Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) at the National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University and collaborators.

In research published in Physical Review X, the international team showed that a quantum computer is less in thrall to the arrow of time than a classical computer. In some cases, it is as if the quantum computer doesn’t need to distinguish between cause and effect at all.

The new work is inspired by an influential discovery (known as causal asymmetry) made almost ten years ago by complexity scientists James Crutchfield and John Mahoney at the University of California, Davis. They showed that many statistical data sequences will have a built-in arrow of time. An observer who sees the data played from beginning to end, like the frames of a movie, can model what comes next using only a modest amount of memory about what occurred before. An observer who tries to model the system in reverse has a much harder task – potentially needing to track orders of magnitude more information.

“If causal asymmetry is only found in classical models, it suggests our perception of cause and effect, and thus time, can emerge from enforcing a classical explanation on events in a fundamentally quantum world”, researchers say. (1)

Look at the cosmos through the lenses of the irrational.

And you will discover a thrilling new perspective.

You are seeing…

Because you used to be blind…

You are alive…

Because you were dead…

You do exist.

Only because you never did…

You are everything.

Just because there is nothing…