White noise. Dark fear.

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

White noise is not the same as other noise – and even a quiet environment does not have the same effect as white noise. With a background of continuous white noise, hearing pure sounds becomes even more precise, as researchers have shown. Their findings could be applied to the further development of cochlear implants. (1)

Being cast alone in a dark forest.

How can we hear anything?

If not because we already hear everything?

How can distinguish any sound?

If not for the constant sound you are in?

Can you feel wet if you haven’t ever dived into the ocean?

Listen to your heart.

You wouldn’t be full of fear.

If you weren’t already afraid…

Can’t you see?

That there is nothing you haven’t already seen?

Bear. Silence. Destruction.

Alaska’s Gates of the Arctic National Park is so vast that it stretches across an area bigger than Vermont, Rhode Island and Delaware combined.

Karupa Lake, tucked off in its northern corner, is so remote that reaching it takes a four-hour skiplane flight from Fairbanks. And it’s so quiet — a day alone there could leave you thinking humans no longer existed.

Scientists recently set up audio recording equipment at Karupa Lake as part of a larger effort to document the changing soundscapes of our national parks. They retrieved the equipment months later. It was destroyed. They then salvaged the recordings, and found a surprise: Footsteps, sniffs, huffs, a series of clattering crunches, then silence.

Bear versus sound recorder. Bear wins. (1)

In the deep silence even the slightest noise seems to fill the cosmos. In the darkest hour even the dimest light seems to blind you.

But the bear is not there. The noise is not heard. The light does not shine. Everything is still silent. Everything is still dark.

You are just too occupied to notice…

Forget the bear.

Listen to the noise.

Inside you…

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