The past does die… Can you listen to it being born?

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Lawrence Brooks [source]

Meet Lawrence Brooks.

The oldest WWII veteran aged 110, holding a photo of his younger self in the picture above.

He is oldest American WWII veteran and also the oldest living man in the United States. Born in September 12, 1909 (source).

Proud past.

Holding our present together.

But there is a dark secret behind it.

Because you see…

Light needs darkness to be born.

You see..

One day he will be gone.

Unfortunately…

One day we will forget.

One day…

The past will die.

Sadly.

It is the only way it can be reborn.

And in the midst of the most glorious peacful day…

While drawing its last silent breath…

The drums of War will start humming loud and clear far far away…

Creating with style…

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Photo by Matteo Badini from Pexels

In search of inspiration for improving computer-based text translators, researchers at Dartmouth College turned to the Bible for guidance. The result is an algorithm trained on various versions of the sacred texts that can convert written works into different styles for different audiences.

Internet tools to translate text between languages like English and Spanish are widely available. Creating style translators – tools that keep text in the same language but transform the style – have been much slower to emerge. The Dartmouth-led team saw in the Bible “a large, previously untapped dataset of aligned parallel text.” Beyond providing infinite inspiration, each version of the Bible contains more than 31,000 verses that the researchers used to produce over 1.5 million unique pairings of source and target verses for machine-learning training sets.

“The English-language Bible comes in many different written styles, making it the perfect source text to work with for style translation,” said Keith Carlson, a PhD student at Dartmouth and lead author of the research paper about the study.

As an added benefit for the research team, the Bible is already thoroughly indexed by the consistent use of book, chapter and verse numbers. The predictable organization of the text across versions eliminates the risk of alignment errors that could be caused by automatic methods of matching different versions of the same text.

“The Bible is a ‘divine’ data set to work with to study this task,” said Daniel Rockmore, a professor of computer science at Dartmouth and contributing author on the study. “Humans have been performing the task of organizing Bible texts for centuries, so we didn’t have to put our faith into less reliable alignment algorithms.” (1)

In the beginning there was Logos.

And we tried to express God with words.

We were bad at it in the beginning.

But gradually we learned.

To use words better.

To express ourselves.

To make art with lifeless marking on white paper.

And people read and wept.

And people believed and followed.

And people forgot.

And people became indifferent.

At the end, the markings on the paper were dead.

Being nothing more than sad reminders.

That we once upon a time were alive.

That we used to be part of God.

In the beginning there was Logos.

And we tried to express God with words.

We were so good at it in the beginning…

PS. Dartmouth College has a long history of innovation in computer science. The term “artificial intelligence” was coined at Dartmouth during a 1956 conference that created the AI research discipline. Other advancements include the design of BASIC – the first general-purpose and accessible programing language – and the Dartmouth Time-Sharing System that contributed to the modern-day operating system.

Life & Death 10-lines monthly poetry contest

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Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

A new Life & Death 10-lines monthly poetry contest!

The rules are simple:

  1. Write a poem for the subject ‘Life & Death’
  2. Maximum number or lines: 10 lines. Ten. Not eleven.
  3. A line may contain a ‘normal’ number of characters, i.e. ~80.
  4. Try to be poetic. Even the slightest honest effort to do so, will gravely improve your work. And remember. Don’t try to imitate a poet. Just think of life and death. And be one!

Send your poem here as a comment, or via email at skakos@hotmail.com or at harmonia-philosophica@hotmail.com. Remember to also send your contact details (these details will not be shared with anyone, they will be used only for the voting stage – see below).

All poems will be published at this page.

A separate voting stage will follow: All participants will vote for the best poem. You are not allowed to vote for your own poem.

Winner will get nothing. Except the public acknowledgment that he or she won the contest.

Happy writing!

Death & Love story 1: “Every day”…

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Photo by Tobias Bjørkli from Pexels

He was here again. Ready to see her.

It was a promise he could not break.

“Daddy, will you come see me every day?” she asked.

“Yes my dear. I will be with you every day”, he answered.

The little kid jumped in joy.

And the dad burst into tears.

A huge hug.

He still feels her in his arms.

Waiting to hug here again…

He was very old now. Waiting to die.

Wanted to hug her one more time.

His feet couldn’t support his as he reached the place.

Neither could his heart.

“Daddy, will you come see me every day?” she asked.

“Yes my love”, he whispered as he fell on the grave.

And the last thing he could sense he did was smile.

Waiting to hug here again for one more time…

Harmonia Philosophica: Articles from the future? [Time travel blogging and the illusion of control]

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Harmonia Philosophica sites include many pre-scheduled articles. This is the only way sites of this magnitude can be sustained so that their readers are up-to-date.

However there is an amazing little secret in these scheduled articles: They include also many post-mortem articles which will apprear in many years from now, including many which will appear centuries from now up to even 10,000 (yes, ten thousand) years from now!

Why is that?

Well, simply put: I have a lot of things to say and so little time to say it!

So I constantly write and write and write, until I… keep on writing! An in order not to overdose my readers with daily articles (or even multiple articles per day) I just spread the articles in time…

So everything seems under control…

Right? Wrong!

Recently one of my post-mortem posts showed up in one of my sites!

Well before its time (it was scheduled to be published on August 15 of the year 2359, you can now see it at my other Harmonia portal at Blogger! Check the date! It is the correct one! August 15, 2359! And yet… here it is!

Conspiracy?

Time travel?

Who knows?

All I know, is that I was right!

Nothing is under control. (check the post to see what I mean)

I feel so relaxed now…