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Photo by Bruce Getty from Pexels

Whether a worm, a human or a blue whale, all multicellular life begins as a single-celled egg. From this solitary cell emerges the galaxy of others needed to build an organism, with each new cell developing in the right place at the right time to carry out a precise function in coordination with its neighbors.

This feat is one of the most remarkable in the natural world, and despite decades of study, a complete understanding of the process has eluded biologists.

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Silence tells more than screaming...

Now, in three landmark studies published online April 26 in Science, Harvard Medical School and Harvard University researchers report how they have systematically profiled every cell in developing zebrafish and frog embryos to establish a roadmap revealing how one cell builds an entire organism. (1)

How was the cosmos created?

How did the stars come to be?

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Solving problems. In two languages.

How did life become… alive?

Irrelevant questions. Boring quests.

Searching for the how. In a world made out of Whys.

Looking for death. In a cosmos made out of life…

Imagine a cosmos without causes. A world without laws. A universe governed by will. A fascinating universe. See that little blind man. Brought into the universe unwillingly. Caring about nothing. Just wanting to find out how everything happened. An insect in a universe governed by titans. A shadow of nothingness, in a cosmos made out of everything.

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Dogs, grammar, silence...

The world will soon get rid of that insect.

The cosmos will be silenced again.

Logos will utter its last words.

And just out of nothing.

A man will be re-born…

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