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Columbia scientists have identified a brain region that helps tell an animal when to attack an intruder and when to accept it into its home. This brain area, called CA2, is part of the hippocampus, a larger brain structure known to be critical for our memory of people, places, things and events.

CA2 was already known to specialize in social memory, the ability to remember encounters with others. Surprisingly, today’s findings reveal that a single brain region can control both higher-order cognition, like social memory, and an innate, instinctual behavior like social aggression. And because CA2 dysfunction has been implicated in psychiatric diseases, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, these results provide further support that altered CA2 function may contribute to abnormal social behaviors associated with such illnesses. (1)

I know you.

Thus, I kill you.

I love you.

Thus, I die for you.

I don’t care.

So at the end, we both die.

Why does always someone have to die in this scenario, as StarLord eloquently asked once upon a time? Well, the answer is simple. Because the moment you start looking into someone else you start questioning yourself. The moment you look into yourself, you start having doubt about you. At the end, the moment you (thought you) walked out of that cave, you started doubting its existence.

But the cave is there.

It is real.

And no, you don’t walk out of it.

You entered right into it…

Hey Plato!

Nice to know you.

You are dead…