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A black hole is conventionally thought of as an astronomical object that irrevocably consumes all matter and radiation which comes within its sphere of influence. Physically, a black hole is defined by the presence of a singularity, i.e., a region of space, bounded by an ‘event horizon’, within which the mass/energy density becomes infinite, and the normally well-behaved laws of physics no longer apply. However, as an article in the journal Nature Astronomy demonstrates, a precise and agreed definition of this ‘singular’ state proves to be frustratingly elusive.

Its author, Dr. Erik Curiel of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, summarizes the problem as follows: “The properties of black holes are the subject of investigations in a range of subdisciplines of physics — in optical physics, in quantum physics and of course in astrophysics. But each of these specialties approaches the problem with its own specific set of theoretical concepts”. (1)

Beliefs shaping theories.

Theories shaping beliefs.

We are caught in a vicious circle of subjectivenes, which can only distort the picture we have for the cosmos. And the only way out is to break the circle. By believing nothing. By having no theories. And it is only then, in the midst of the black hole of no-knowledge, that all wisdom will emerge…

Steadfast. Resolute. Firm.

Not based on anything.

Because it will BE everything.