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Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

The next time you set a kettle to boil, consider this scenario: After turning the burner off, instead of staying hot and slowly warming the surrounding kitchen and stove, the kettle quickly cools to room temperature and its heat hurtles away in the form of a boiling-hot wave.

We know heat doesn’t behave this way in our day-to-day surroundings. But MIT researchers observed this seemingly implausible mode of heat transport, known as “second sound,” in a rather commonplace material: graphite.

At temperatures of 120 kelvin (-240 degrees Fahrenheit), they saw clear signs that heat can travel through graphite in a wavelike motion. Points that were originally warm are left instantly cold, as the heat moves across the material at close to the speed of sound. The behavior resembles the wavelike way in which sound travels through air, so scientists have dubbed this exotic mode of heat transport “second sound.”

The discovery, published in Science, suggests that graphite, and perhaps its high-performance relative, graphene, may efficiently remove heat in microelectronic devices in a way that was previously unrecognized. (1)

The world seems dominated by waves.

Waves of gravity.

Waves of sound.

Heat waves.

Waves on the rough sea.

Waves of people moving together.

Places of high heat. Places of extreme cold.

Taking turns in the split of a second.

Because there is no heat to be transferred.

Only the cosmos’ potential to change on the spot.

A cosmos full of consciousness.

A cosmos full of empty space.

Both taking turns on the substrate of existence.

With Being orchestrating everything.

A rock on a pond.

Generating waves.

Watch the waves reaching the shore.

Slowing degrading.

No, it is not the rock which made them be.

But the surface of the lake itself.

Look deep inside that lake, and you will see…

That no rock ever reached the bottom…