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picofcentury

A 1967 photo of the Copernicus crater (near my real estate) by Lunar Orbiter 2, also known as “Picture of the Century”

Ebb and Flow chased each other around the moon for nearly a year, peering into the interior. With dwindling fuel supplies, the twin NASA spacecraft are ready for a dramatic finish.

On Monday, they will plunge — seconds apart — into a mountain near the moon’s north pole. It’s a carefully choreographed ending so that they don’t end up crashing into the Apollo landing sites or any other place on the moon with special importance. Skywatchers on Earth won’t be able to view the double impacts since they will occur in the dark side of the Moon. [1]

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This is not the first time NASA sends a spacecraft to crash on the dark side of the moon. The Lunar Orbiter 2, which took the infamous photo of the century (see above), also had the same fate… [2]

An explosion happening where no one will see it. Will that explosion really “happen”? If yes, how would you know it happened? How can something which you will never be able to watch… “take place”? Does a tree falling in a forest where there is no one to watch, really make a sound when falling? Can events “take place” without any concsious watchers… watching?

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Weird simple questions, which only fools answer lightheartedly…

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