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When assessing the moral character of others, people cling to good impressions but readily adjust their opinions about those who have behaved badly, according to new research. This flexibility in judging transgressors might help explain both how humans forgive – and why they sometimes stay in bad relationships, said the study’s authors. (The research – conducted by psychologists at Yale, University of Oxford, University College London, and the International School for Advanced Studies – appeared in the journal Nature Human Behaviour)

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Plants. Seeing.

“The brain forms social impressions in a way that can enable forgiveness,” said Yale psychologist Molly Crockett, senior author of the paper. “Because people sometimes behave badly by accident, we need to be able to update bad impressions that turn out to be mistaken. Otherwise, we might end relationships prematurely and miss out on the many benefits of social connection”. (1)

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Being ethically inferior. Because you are ethically superior. Opposites. Whole.

Modern humans. Lost humans.

Believing they do not forgive.

But that they are programmed to.

And yet, we once again see the wrong question.

Attaching it to the wrong answer.

If we are programmed to forgive.

We should not hate. And yet we do.

Look at all that hatred in peoples’ eyes.

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There was never a better proof of love…