Brain. Memory. Flashes and lights…

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A new study from Nathan Rose, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Notre Dame, examined a fundamental problem your brain has to solve, which is keeping information “in mind”, or active, so your brain can act accordingly.

The common theory is that the information is kept in mind by neurons related to the information actively firing throughout a delay period, a theory that has been dominant since at least the 1940s, according to Rose.

However, in a new paper published in Science, Rose and his team give weight to the synaptic theory, a less well-known and tested model. The synaptic theory suggests that information can be retained for short periods of time by specific changes in the links, or weights, between neurons.

And even though a specific memory could seem vanished from the brain (due to total lack of any neuron activity), when researchers reactivated specific regions of the brain which were previously active when the memory was formed, the specific pattern of the phenomenally lost memory reappeared out of the blue. (1)

We do NOT know how and where data is stored into our brain. And yet, we are so certain that it is stored there… Even though evidence suggests something “else” is keeping the information inside “us”, we are so certain that this is based on the brain that no alternative might be considered.

We like seeing flashes and lights. And we believe what we see.

This memory was “not there”. And yet, we believed it was still there. And we managed to find it. Reappearing only after the brain region was stimulated again. But could this memory or any memory be stored in the neurons’ structure of an ever-changing brain? Or is it more logical to assume that it is stored in the ever-lasting structure of an eternal cosmos?

Everything changes. And yet we stay the same.

One self, with memories. Wandering through the cold cosmos.

Pondering. Who are we? What dark dreams have haunted us?

I had forgotten. But now I know again. My memory is back…

Those flashes and lights…

Out of the darkness, light again.

Oh, how much we like seeing flashes and lights…

Speaking English. Speaking Spanish. Speaking… whatever. [Ghosts in the machine, or in the brain instead…]

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The family of a 16-year-old Georgia boy is describing how he woke from a coma speaking Spanish instead of English. Reuben Nsemoh was playing goalie for a Gwinnett County team late last month when another player accidentally kicked him in the head while he was diving for the ball, local ABC affiliate WSB-TV reported.

The high school sophomore, who has now suffered three soccer-related concussions, fell into a coma for several days. When he woke up, he could only speak in Spanish instead of English.

Reuben, whose English has since returned, said he knew a little Spanish because his friends and a brother speak the language. But he’d never felt comfortable holding a conversation in Spanish before his injury, he said. “I wasn’t perfect, but my brother is a really fluent Spanish speaker, so he kind of inspired me with that too,” he told WSB. His Spanish gradually slipped away after he woke up, Reuben said. (1)

The brain knows things the mind is not aware of.

All input is somewhere somehow recorded.

And readily available for anyone who can access them.

Now imagine something bigger than the Spanish language you heard once. Imagine that your brain/ mind has interfered with the whole cosmos. Imagine that your brain/ mind interferes with the whole cosmos constantly from ever since you were born. Imagine you being in a universe and constantly learning without ever knowing you learn.

Now imagine you are dumb.

Imagine you know nothing.

How absurd that sounds?

Sick. Healthy. Hallucinations. Truth. [Are you humble enough?]

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It’s a local news story that Stephen King could take notes from: Five people fell ill and started hallucinating, one after another, following contact with one woman who started seeing things in the dead of night.

The caretaker of a 78-year-old woman called the police in North Bend, Oregon’s pre-dawn hours to report people vandalizing her vehicle, KVAL news reports. The cops came and went, finding nothing, only to be called back at 5:30 a.m. for a similar complaint. The officers suspected she was hallucinating, and took her to the hospital, where she was given a clean bill of health and discharged.

But as the day wore on, everyone who’d come in contact with her started showing similar symptoms of mental distress: Both deputies, the 78-year-old woman, and a hospital employee all had to be hospitalized for similar symptoms.

That afternoon, a hazmat team descended on Oregon’s Bay Area Hospital, and the home where it all started, decontaminating vehicles and clearing the emergency room. They turned up nothing. “No source of the contamination has been found,” Sgt. Pat Downing told KVAL. “The vehicles, equipment and uniforms have been checked with no contaminates identified or located on or about them.” Not a blip in the patients’ blood samples, either. (1)

We are the others.

The others are us.

Sometimes we believe this holds true at a metaphorical or symbolical level. Only when we truly realize that this is true at the lowest literal level possible (as it is the case with all great philosophical truths), will we be able to let go of our prejudices and see others as they truly are.

Are we healthy?

Or are the sick healthy instead?

Are you humble enough to accept the unacceptable?

A mind anticipating everything… A human mind… God’s mind.

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Scientists have shown how the brain anticipates all of the new situations that it may encounter in a lifetime by creating a special kind of neural network that is ‘pre-adapted’ to face any eventuality. A study shows that a seemingly miraculous pre-adaptation comes from connections between neurons that form recurrent loops where inputs can rebound and mix in the network. (1)

Loops which feed themselves in order to cope with anything.

Self-referencing consciousness which can examine and question itself.

Existence because of existence. Being as a result of nothing. Everything and anything being and not being at the same time.

A mind anticipating everything…

Because it already knows everything.

A human mind…

God’s mind.

Zero. Unknown. And yet, so familiar…

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When seeing a number of dots, a weird process takes place in our brain. According to a new research, the parietal lobe registers the lack of any dots as a missing visual stimulus, without quantitative significance and therefore fundamentally different from numbers. But at the next level at which processing takes place, the frontal lobe, the neurons treated the absence of elements as an empty set among other countable sets, with the greatest similarity to the number one. “Not until it gets to the frontal lobe does the empty set become abstracted as a value on the number line, analogously with the behavior of the animals” says Professor Andreas Nieder. (1)

Our internal knowledge of “nothing” drives us.

We believe we discover the world.

But we already know it…

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